Below are some examples of the TV and radio work we've done over the years.  Included are bio ads, contrast ads and issue ads.  We've shown some of the interesting ways we've tried to tell the story, including using humor.

Knowing that we faced a lot of competition in a district with multiple media markets during a presidential election cycle, we fashioned a series of ads for Bill Johnson to cut through the clutter. These "how-to" ads portrayed Bill Johnson doing the mundane tasks that many of us face each day - fixing a leaky faucet, cleaning windows, changing oil in a car and mowing the lawn. Bill provided tips and tied it all together with his work in Washington. This ad won a Pollie Award as the best congressional radio ad of the cycle.

 

As Hillary Clinton was battling Bernie Sanders for the Democratic nomination, we helped Restoration PAC refocus on Clinton's record as Secretary of State, especially as it related to the Benghazi attacks. We produced both 60 and 30 second versions of this spot.

 

This classic ad shows how creative and funny a campaign can be with "negative" opposition research. Running in a coal-rich district, we learned that our opponent had spent time in Germany at a clean energy summit. "German Class" shared the lessons we learned. 

 

Five seconds isn't a long time to share a story. Our goal here was to build Judge Rusu's name identification while reminding everyone why he's the right person for the job, particularly since he was appointed right after a scandal in the court.

 

We decided to break the "fourth wall" in this Pandora ad for Bill Johnson.  Since we targeted users aged 35+, our reference to Justin Bieber at the end helped make the ad memorable for listeners.

 

State Senator Bill Beagle faced a tough re-election.  One of his strengths was that he's not a career politician.  We decided to remind voters that Bill is one of them in this spot entitled "My Hometown."

 

Columbus area State Senate Kevin Bacon is a good sport about sharing his name with the actor Kevin Bacon.  In this spot, we decided to have a little fun with it as people play a slightly-off version of 6 degrees of Kevin Bacon.

 

Congressman Bill Johnson came up from humble beginnings.  We used a drone and other techniques to share that story as Bill talks about how his past influences his present and future.

 

Issue One, Ohio's "Third Frontier" bond issue appeared on the ballot during a primary election.  We were asked to create an ad for conservatives who might have reservations about the state taking on additional debt. This ad resonated well on conservative talk radio.

 

Here’s an ad that shows the important role Ohio's Third Frontier program plays in taking Ohio's economy from one relying on strong hands to one relying on strong minds.

 

Conservative Brad Wenstrup challenged incumbent Congresswoman Jean Schmidt in a GOP primary. Schmidt was known for getting an aisle seat during the State of the Union Address and happened to give President Obama a kiss. We recreated the moment and sprinkled in information about her record. Conservative Republican voters were not happy with Ms. Schmidt’s tenure and this ad reminded them of it. Wenstrup won the primary and now serves as a Member of Congress.

 

This was was filmed right at the tipping point of smartphones and go pro cameras.  We used the concept of a camera in every pocket to film a rally promoting jobs and Ohio's Third Frontier Program.

 

In Wisconsin several senators faced recall elections.  This spot for one of the challengers uses an interesting device to list all the reasons why the incumbent Senator should be recalled.  It's a good example of the importance of finding an interesting and memorable hook for sharing message points.

 

Judge Maureen Lally Green ran for Supreme Court in Pennslyvania.  As a large and diverse state, the goal of this ad was to build Judge Lally Green's name ID while showing a wide range of support from Pennsylvanians.

 

Bill Johnson was challenging Congressman Charlie Wilson in the general election.  Wilson had received some bad press for not holding townhall meetings, so we used the hook of an old time detective story to file a "missing person" report.

 

In this spot we reinforced people's images of career politicians and reminded them that Bill Johnson is different.

 

Judge Judi French wanted to remind people of a Judge's primary responsibility, which we did in this spot using children reading the Constitution as a memorable tag.

 
 

Tough-on-crime candidate for county prosecutor Ken Oswalt used an interesting hook to get people's attention. He told them that some people WON'T be voting for him. Of course, that's because most felons aren't allowed to vote.

 

There wasn't a lot of opposition research in the race for County Clerk of Courts.  Our opponent was an instructor at a college, so we used the opinions of those who knew her best - the students.

 

One great thing about radio is that you can still do some advanced targeting.  This spots, aimed at women, let Dewey Stokes' wife do the talking for Dewey.

 

Betty Montgomery had served as Ohio's Attorney General for eight years and her opponent, Marc Dann, had no experience as a prosecutor or running a large government office. Unfortunately, a national wave election helped elect Dann in a very close race. This spot proved prescient when Dann had to resign in disgrace and was convicted of crimes in office - after finally admitting he simply had not been qualified for the job.

 

Jimmy Stewart's district covered a large area in Southeastern Ohio.  This spot highlights the rolling hills that dot the landscape and the amount of windshield time Jimmy put in representing his constituents.

 

After serving as State Treasurer, Joe Deters returned to Hamilton County to wage a write in campaign for county prosecutor. This spot reminded people why Joe is the right choice and also reinforces the need to write him in, with an assist from President George W. Bush.

 

Janet Creighton's opponent served while Canton was irreversibly changed by job losses.  In radio, powerful audio is important, and this ad suggests her opponent was sleeping on the job through the constant hum of snoring.

 

This ad, commissioned by a county Republican party highlighted a scandal involving Democrat officeholders.  The style of the ad reinforced the scandal, which involved a theatre project.

 

This radio spot uses a circus to highlight the twists, turns and other stunts pulled by various Democratic candidates and officeholders.

 

In Cincinnati, crime was a serious problem but the jail was overcrowded. When we learned that many offenders were being let back on the streets because of the jail being too full, we knew this spot would help make that point.

 

There's nothing worse for books than water, so this ad uses strong sounds to remind residents of Louisville Kentucky why they should support the library levy.

 

In a heavily Democrat urban county, there was only one opening against a popular and well-known Democrat incumbent - she got a free roof on her house, courtesy of a county contractor. This memorable ad tells the story of a politician's misuse of taxpayer money in nursery rhyme form. This ad helped defeat the incumbent.

 

Another radio segment that you can target is religious listeners.  This spot aired on religious stations where Betty Montgomery recalled a story about faith from Matthew that helped guide her in public life.

 

In this ad, we use a humorous "Professor" to push back against an opponent's misleading ads.

 

In South Dakota, small towns are the lifeblood of the state and when we advised the re-election campaign of Governor George Mickelson, we used small towns as a frame for the economic growth that was in place because of Governor Mickelson’s policies. He won the race in a landslide.